Waxing artefacts

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PinkFloyd
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Waxing artefacts

Post by PinkFloyd »

To get an item like they do in a museum , what’s the procedure ? I’d like a thickish lustre .

Rub the wax on, let it dry then buff it off....wax again , let it dry, buff off ect.....

Or rub wax on, let it dry, rub more wax on, let it dry, rub more wax on....then buff it up ?

::g



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Re: Waxing artefacts

Post by lonecoiler »

I would do it like Mr Miagi wax on wax off =)) :;@
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Re: Waxing artefacts

Post by PinkFloyd »

Have you got his number ? :))

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Re: Waxing artefacts

Post by sweepstick47 »

Hello Pink Floyd, Your question comes under conservation and to apply the appropriate finish to any item,there are many factors to be considered, not least of which are the items composition and condition. Difficult if not impossible to offer a a single process that suits any artefact.
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Re: Waxing artefacts

Post by GeorgeMK »

A lot of museums used microcrystalline Renaissance Wax, which was developed by the British Museum, but now the conservators are saying not to use wax but to use ParaloidB72™ as a coating, and for joining broken artefacts.

The Renaissance Wax was applied, allowed to dry, then buffed.

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Re: Waxing artefacts

Post by Me and my boy »

Great question and good responses.
As per SS47 above it all depends on the item.
As an example; this seal has only been lightly rinsed( in a puddle😩)but to avoid any further deterioration it has been left as it.
Would you remove soil in indents with toothpicks or leave as is?
Fully rinse of soil then dry and wax?
Leave as is?
I suppose it’s all personal choice and one museum conservator will say do, one will say don’t wax etc.
If you leave they go matt if you wax you trap can trap in moisture.
I have know idea.
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Re: Waxing artefacts

Post by PinkFloyd »

Right , this is the item..
It's been electrolysis'd
Baked at 250 degrees 90mins
Surface rust removed brass wire wheel
Rust converted twice
Baked again at 250 degrees 30 mins .

It's now ready to be waxed ...
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Re: Waxing artefacts

Post by staters quo »

The only two things I ever waxed - a couple of Roman grots - developed bronze disease within a year, probably because of the moisture that was trapped inside.

The shield boss I would leave as it is. It'll need to breathe and although it got given the Mary Berry treatment it will have been reabsorbing moisture as it cooled down. I think it looks quite good at the moment.

The seal again I would leave as it is. The remaining mud is giving it character as well as making it clear and legible. I have on occasion given items such as this a light dry buff on a smooth cotton cloth stretched around my leg, which will give a subtle sheen without any wax. Just be careful with it and make sure you don't do it on blue jeans like I did when I stained a perfectly good Roman dark blue :-L

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Re: Waxing artefacts

Post by Me and my boy »

staters quo wrote:
Tue Jan 14, 2020 6:03 pm
The only two things I ever waxed - a couple of Roman grots - developed bronze disease within a year, probably because of the moisture that was trapped inside.

The shield boss I would leave as it is. It'll need to breathe and although it got given the Mary Berry treatment it will have been reabsorbing moisture as it cooled down. I think it looks quite good at the moment.

The seal again I would leave as it is. The remaining mud is giving it character as well as making it clear and legible. I have on occasion given items such as this a light dry buff on a smooth cotton cloth stretched around my leg, which will give a subtle sheen without any wax. Just be careful with it and make sure you don't do it on blue jeans like I did when I stained a perfectly good Roman dark blue :-L
Good advice. I like the blue jeans bit.

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Re: Waxing artefacts

Post by sweepstick47 »

Me and my boy wrote:
Tue Jan 14, 2020 5:21 pm
Great question and good responses.
As per SS47 above it all depends on the item.
As an example; this seal has only been lightly rinsed( in a puddle😩)but to avoid any further deterioration it has been left as it.
Would you remove soil in indents with toothpicks or leave as is?
Fully rinse of soil then dry and wax?
Leave as is?
I suppose it’s all personal choice and one museum conservator will say do, one will say don’t wax etc.
If you leave they go matt if you wax you trap can trap in moisture.
I have know idea.
A very fine seal ::g I have successfully removed the 'chalky infill' from the depressions by putting a couple of drops of (squeezy) lemon juice on just one or two letters on the face as a test, the results should gently remove only the chalky deposit treated then act accordingly.

I also have some seals where I've left the chalky deposit as it entails both time and patience. ;)
Regards ss47
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Re: Waxing artefacts

Post by Oxgirl36 »

sweepstick47 wrote:
Tue Jan 14, 2020 6:20 pm
Me and my boy wrote:
Tue Jan 14, 2020 5:21 pm
Great question and good responses.
As per SS47 above it all depends on the item.
As an example; this seal has only been lightly rinsed( in a puddle😩)but to avoid any further deterioration it has been left as it.
Would you remove soil in indents with toothpicks or leave as is?
Fully rinse of soil then dry and wax?
Leave as is?
I suppose it’s all personal choice and one museum conservator will say do, one will say don’t wax etc.
If you leave they go matt if you wax you trap can trap in moisture.
I have know idea.
A very fine seal ::g I have successfully removed the 'chalky infill' from the depressions by putting a couple of drops of (squeezy) lemon juice on just one or two letters on the face as a test, the results should gently remove only the chalky deposit treated then act accordingly.

I also have some seals where I've left the chalky deposit as it entails both time and patience. ;)
Regards ss47
Lemon juice? Noooooooo :-SS

Wooden toothpick or cocktail stick to tease out the dirt. Slow and careful. Definitely no water and no wax.
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Re: Waxing artefacts

Post by Oxgirl36 »

PinkFloyd wrote:
Tue Jan 14, 2020 5:40 pm
Right , this is the item..
It's been electrolysis'd
Baked at 250 degrees 90mins
Surface rust removed brass wire wheel
Rust converted twice
Baked again at 250 degrees 30 mins .

It's now ready to be waxed ...
Oily rag. Seriously, it’s what the old boys do with their irons tools and it works, then you can buff it. Not wax, cause it won’t let it breathe.
Carpe vinum

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Re: Waxing artefacts

Post by PinkFloyd »

Too late, it’s waxed .


The oily rag does work,, but you do it every day after you’ve used the tool ,
Not sure if you just left it, it would work ::g

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Re: Waxing artefacts

Post by sweepstick47 »

Lemon juice? Noooooooo :-SS

Wooden toothpick or cocktail stick to tease out the dirt. Slow and careful. Definitely no water and no wax.[/quote]
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

In order to clear the mud from within the lettering of a seal matrix face, initially I use a softened wooden cocktail stick and proceed with all due care, but when the contaminant is an accumulation of calcium carbonate as found in soils with a high chalk content - typically Lincolnshire, then I find the best method is to use lemon juice sparingly applied or as I've found it to be both cheaper and more effective, a mild solution of acetic acid and warm water (warm only because the crystals dissolve more quickly) ;) thereafter checking frequently to assess progress.

In determining the ideal ratio of acid to water, simply experiment by adjusting the amount of water until satisfactory. For a test piece, I used a well furred-up ballcock arm from a plumbing job before dealing with the subject seal.

I suppose you could say it's just 'my solution'. I know, it's just me. :D - Regards ss47
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Re: Waxing artefacts

Post by Bors »

Then what`s the plan of action when all the waxings done x;
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Re: Waxing artefacts

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Re: Waxing artefacts

Post by PinkFloyd »

Bors wrote:
Tue Jan 14, 2020 10:04 pm
Then what`s the plan of action when all the waxings done x;
Thats to Mr Pink by the way. .....Half a Bra for Maddona :D
It was offered to a local museum who make it perfectly clear it would be put out the back probably never seen again, so...I’ve a joiner friend who is making a cabinet to display the sword and boss.
There is another boss, much worse condition that I will clean .
And I’ve yet to start work on the sword .
Suppose I must add that the 3 items have been recorded ::g

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Re: Waxing artefacts

Post by thefiggis »

Sorry - had to remove some off-topic posts
Essential equipment:
Some sort of electrical gubbins(I'm told it's a Deus). In various colours
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Re: Waxing artefacts

Post by statbloke »

I used to use Renaissance Wax on Roman coins and other metal finds but have been warned against it by conservation experts. Not only can it trap in moisture but over time can go off and a bit smelly. May have been a used by museums in the past but not any more. There are other coatings which are sometimes used in conservation but not this one.
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Re: Waxing artefacts

Post by GeorgeMK »

amphora wrote:
Wed Jan 15, 2020 1:27 pm
I use paraffin for many years now and am happy with it (brass/copper/zink only btw).

With warmth, as then the air goes out pulling in the paraffin deep.
Also a good tip for wax to do that with warmth. As it is the air in the find which makes it possible to corrode.

Paraffin is also cheap to do, as i use those white tea lights without color or flavour. And do more then one session with them.
Do you mean Paraffin Wax?
Paraffin (oil) would not be a good rust preventer.

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Re: Waxing artefacts

Post by PinkFloyd »

I've neatly forgot what wax I used..it's something like treborius

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Re: Waxing artefacts

Post by thefiggis »

I used microcrystalline for a bit at first, then learned it's not very good for the object over time. Seems that ParaloidB72 gets the nod now.
Essential equipment:
Some sort of electrical gubbins(I'm told it's a Deus). In various colours
Jenkins
Gin.

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Re: Waxing artefacts

Post by GeorgeMK »

White tea candles, that’s the solid version, so it’s the wax, not the liquid a.k.a. kerosene.

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