Fossile dung

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dep1699
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Fossile dung

Post by dep1699 »

Apparently this is a fossilised dung from a dung Beatle from Cretaceous period
IMG_20181009_092459-689x443.jpg
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Re: Fossile dung

Post by dep1699 »

I forgot to mention that both are about 3 cm diameter.

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Re: Fossile dung

Post by mrix »

Hello and thanks for posting, from what I am aware it's known as coprolite ::g
I have never found any personally, I may of done but would be hard to know :))
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Re: Fossile dung

Post by dep1699 »

Yes, coprolites is the right word (from the Greek kopros=fecies and lithos= stone) that translate in stone poi :-).
But you can also find the actual thing. The round shaped one were worked by the dung Beatle that actually keep them in this form to store food in its nest and use them as a protective shell (and food) for the larvae.

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Re: Fossile dung

Post by Keef the Frog »

I've a shark coprolite I found near Levington Marina
Rolling about naked in mud will give the wrong impression.

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Re: Fossile dung

Post by cookertron »

Do you have a link for me to follow, I've never heard of fossilised dung beetle dung balls?

Thanks in advance
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Re: Fossile dung

Post by fred »

I thought that everything was underwater during the cretateous period and the chalk was being formed. The fossils look just like fossilised sponges to me.

http://www.oum.ox.ac.uk/thezone/fossils ... sponge.htm
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Re: Fossile dung

Post by Ladybird66 »

Here you go mrix. Found this one when exploring a new field and waiting for the wheat to be cut.

p.s. Apologies for high-jacking your post dep1699 :D
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Re: Fossile dung

Post by Lowland »

Heres an interesting link on the subject....
They have these fossils at 30 million years old
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2 ... 093524.htm
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Re: Fossile dung

Post by dep1699 »

fred wrote:
Tue Oct 09, 2018 10:25 pm
I thought that everything was underwater during the cretateous period and the chalk was being formed. The fossils look just like fossilised sponges to me.

http://www.oum.ox.ac.uk/thezone/fossils ... sponge.htm
No, there were animals, even big ones :-)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cretaceous

I am not sure that the sponge is correctly classified on that website. The real proof would br to cut one of them, but I don't know how to do iy without reduce it in crumbles.

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Re: Fossile dung

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Re: Fossile dung

Post by dep1699 »

cookertron wrote:
Tue Oct 09, 2018 9:53 pm
Do you have a link for me to follow, I've never heard of fossilised dung beetle dung balls?

Thanks in advance
Posted one link below. See fig 19.13
https://www.researchgate.net/publicatio ... gures?lo=1

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Re: Fossile dung

Post by fred »

dep1699 wrote:
Wed Oct 10, 2018 3:58 am
fred wrote:
Tue Oct 09, 2018 10:25 pm
I thought that everything was underwater during the cretateous period and the chalk was being formed. The fossils look just like fossilised sponges to me.

http://www.oum.ox.ac.uk/thezone/fossils ... sponge.htm
No, there were animals, even big ones :-)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cretaceous

I am not sure that the sponge is correctly classified on that website. The real proof would br to cut one of them, but I don't know how to do iy without reduce it in crumbles.


As always mistakes are possible and a proper ID will largely depend on what it is made of, where it was found and the exact details of it. Assessing all this is is difficult from a single photo, however, the ones in the photo look like flint and I presume that they were found in the UK. If so they will have formed underwater during the Cretaceous period and are likely to be fossilised sponges. If they are not flint or were found elsewhere then they may certainly be something else. There are some specialised sites that might help with an ID. ::g

I find a lot of flint ones similar to these in the southeast where they have been washed out of the chalk by erosion. ::g
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Re: Fossile dung

Post by cookertron »

fred wrote:
Wed Oct 10, 2018 5:44 am
I find a lot of flint ones similar to these in the southeast where they have been washed out of the chalk by erosion. ::g
Me too and as you say they're usually made from flint. I have several round flint balls but without the indentation, they regularly turn up on fields in the Lincolnshire Wolds.

When I get back from the school run I'll photograph my collection and post it here.
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Re: Fossile dung

Post by poly »

Interesting finds. Unfortunately they are more likely to be fossil sponges rather than Dung Beetle derived specimens based on their basic morphological characteristics shown in your photograph and on my experience of finding and examining several different types of fossil sponges in the chalk.

However, fossil evidence of Dung Beetles does go back to the early Cretaceous when much of the UK was still above sea level - so it may be possible your specimens have Dung Beetle origins. Fossil beetles are rare in UK Cretaceous rocks but they do exist !

I doubt if you would like to have the specimens sectioned to possibly confirm identification. Keep a look out for more specimens.

It would also help to know the precise location where the specimens were found as this may also aid identification, together with any other associated fossils finds.
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Re: Fossile dung

Post by cookertron »

poly wrote:
Wed Oct 10, 2018 11:08 am
It would also help to know the precise location where the specimens were found as this may also aid identification, together with any other associated fossils finds.
That sounds like an offer you shouldn't refuse :)
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Re: Fossile dung

Post by dep1699 »

cookertron wrote:
Wed Oct 10, 2018 1:06 pm
poly wrote:
Wed Oct 10, 2018 11:08 am
It would also help to know the precise location where the specimens were found as this may also aid identification, together with any other associated fossils finds.
That sounds like an offer you shouldn't refuse :)
I can say Wessex area :-)

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