Enquiry

Please post any topics related to metal detecting spades, trowels and general Digging tools here.
MDF Auction - Metal Detecting Spades
Post Reply
Sam250
Posts: 1
Joined: Thu Mar 01, 2018 11:30 pm
Has thanked: 4 times

Enquiry

Post by Sam250 » Fri Mar 02, 2018 9:45 pm

Hi all,
I have been wanted to buy a hand digging tool recently and I’ve had my eye on a ‘Garrett edge digger.’ However, these are quite pricy for what they are really are. Just wondering if any of you guys knew of any good quality cheaper alternatives, which also still have a serrated edge and a holster included.
Thanks👍
In response, I think I will definitely look into some of the Black Ada diggers!
Thanks again
Last edited by Sam250 on Fri Mar 02, 2018 10:51 pm, edited 1 time in total.



User avatar
thefiggis
Moderator
Posts: 1223
Joined: Sat Feb 18, 2017 8:19 am
Location: Norfolk
Has thanked: 286 times
Been thanked: 437 times

Re: Enquiry

Post by thefiggis » Fri Mar 02, 2018 10:19 pm

What ho, and welcome to the forum.

If you have a look through the threads in this section you'll see that people have come across some good deals. It depends what you're after. Preferences range from the very latest serrated-edged hand-forged type you need a mortgage for, down to a garden trowel picked up at a local boot fair, but whatever you get it needs to do the job you ask of it.

My own preference is to buy good, buy once and given that the soil I dig has a lot of clay and can be quite hard when dry, I went for an Evolution as it's built to last and I can give it a bit of a larraping, especially if tree roots are involved. On looser soils this build quality may not be so important.
John

User avatar
Steve_T
Posts: 1293
Joined: Thu Jul 30, 2015 12:54 pm
Location: Wiltshire
Has thanked: 303 times
Been thanked: 567 times

Re: Enquiry

Post by Steve_T » Fri Mar 02, 2018 10:21 pm

My advice would be go to a detecting shop near you that does all makes and pick one up and see what it feels like, they are all around the same price bracket and it wouldn't be fair if I claimed one was better than the other, as people choose a particular one for reasons to them

See how it feels rather than choose from pictures, you will be surprised

Regards Steve
_________________________________________________________________
Look deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better.
Albert Einstein

User avatar
Oxgirl36
Moderator
Posts: 3468
Joined: Sun Jul 10, 2016 6:54 pm
Location: Oxfordshire
Has thanked: 1533 times
Been thanked: 1331 times

Re: Enquiry

Post by Oxgirl36 » Fri Mar 02, 2018 10:34 pm

If you’re budget conscious that look at this thread - viewtopic.php?f=46&t=96418

Less than £7 but no holster.

Personally I too have an evolution extreme trowel. They are forever ones but around £30 and the holster I paid another £10 for. Don’t do the hard holsters anymore though :(

Have a look at these options:
https://www.metaldetectingauction.com/c ... owels/1925

Tell us a bit more about your budget, what you want one for etc and we can offer more specific help. :D
XP Deus
9 silver hammered coins (1 in 2016; 7 in 2017) - and, at last, 1 in 2018 :D

User avatar
Rhumours
Posts: 357
Joined: Wed Feb 07, 2018 10:22 pm
Has thanked: 254 times
Been thanked: 207 times

Re: Enquiry

Post by Rhumours » Fri Mar 02, 2018 10:35 pm

I have one. It is serrated but it hasn't been sharpened so it's not dangerous. It is angled and constructed very well. Easy to use and very balanced when digging no strain on a particular part of the hand. Where it sort of fails is small yet deep holes. It's quite long. So if the item is deep and the pointer says you are spot on ... you can dig down with it no problem .... you just can't get much out with it at a time because a)it's narrow and b) it's too long to get it flat in the bottom of a hole to pick up much earth. The end result is you either take out egg cup fulls at a time or end up dog digging with it and flicking out larger amounts of earth. That said I've gotten used to it now ... I've only been doing this lark for a week. But I've gardened all my life and had plenty of cheap trowels. As the previous poster said buy cheap buy twice .... and you will with a cheap trowel no matter what you use it for.
Garret AT Pro ~ Garret Carrot ~ Piranha 35 ~ rather nice wellies ~ registered NCMD member.

User avatar
fred
Posts: 5030
Joined: Wed Dec 10, 2014 6:15 pm
Has thanked: 546 times
Been thanked: 1672 times

Re: Enquiry

Post by fred » Sat Mar 03, 2018 4:28 am

I have never really understood why people use trowels at all. For shallow signals on pasture or lawns I just pinpoint the target with a probe from the surface and work or flick it out with a blunt screwdriver.

For deeper targets and also on rougher surfaces a spade will quickly cut a neater and deeper plug or flap with less bending and less effort. The target is more likely to be in a deep plug but even if it's not you should be nearer to it. In either case the target can then be pinpointed and extracted with the probe and screwdriver. Leaving more soil on a plug lessens disturbance so grass recovers more quickly.

Like everything it takes a little practice to get it perfect but in my opinion it's well worth it. :D
Last edited by fred on Sat Mar 03, 2018 4:42 am, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
thefiggis
Moderator
Posts: 1223
Joined: Sat Feb 18, 2017 8:19 am
Location: Norfolk
Has thanked: 286 times
Been thanked: 437 times

Re: Enquiry

Post by thefiggis » Sat Mar 03, 2018 4:41 am

Perfectly valid points, Fred. However, whenever I'm in amongst the tree roots or on particularly stony ground I find the trowel indispensable in getting between the roots without damaging them and for clearing out awkward, stubborn pieces of flint. Trying to do that with a spade is fine until you hit a hidden rock with it and end up losing several teeth and have your arm go numb for a week. :)
John

User avatar
fred
Posts: 5030
Joined: Wed Dec 10, 2014 6:15 pm
Has thanked: 546 times
Been thanked: 1672 times

Re: Enquiry

Post by fred » Sat Mar 03, 2018 4:53 am

thefiggis wrote:
Sat Mar 03, 2018 4:41 am
Perfectly valid points, Fred. However, whenever I'm in amongst the tree roots or on particularly stony ground I find the trowel indispensable in getting between the roots without damaging them and for clearing out awkward, stubborn pieces of flint. Trying to do that with a spade is fine until you hit a hidden rock with it and end up losing several teeth and have your arm go numb for a week. :)
Generally my narrow transplanting spade will easily deal with stoney ground, albeit at the expense of my boots. It's true that very rooty ground may need a different approach and once in a blue moon I do borrow my mates Lesche tool, which he prefers to a screwdriver.

Anyway what are you doing up at this hour? My excuse is that I am waiting for the snow to melt so that I can drive to the beach. :D

User avatar
thefiggis
Moderator
Posts: 1223
Joined: Sat Feb 18, 2017 8:19 am
Location: Norfolk
Has thanked: 286 times
Been thanked: 437 times

Re: Enquiry

Post by thefiggis » Sat Mar 03, 2018 4:59 am

Having been physically inactive all week thanks to the weather making it impossible to get out of the end of the road, let alone get to work, it seems I need less kip and wake up at odd hours. Can't even get out for a swing ;;z

Have fun if you get there - the snow seems to be finally melting a little here in Narf'k.
John

Post Reply

Return to “Metal Detecting Spades and Digging Tools”